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National Theatre
Greece's first state theatre was founded namely National Theatre  in 1930 by the Minister of Education, George Papandreou. Its remit is, through theatre, to promote culture and preserve Greek cultural identity.
Chief among its specific areas of interest are:
•    The study and research of ancient drama, and its staging and dissemination in Greece and abroad.
•    The staging, promotion and development of Greek and especially modern Greek playwriting.
•    The staging and interpretation of classic works.
•    The study and investigation of new theatrical forms and experimental modes of expression
•    Productions for children and young people.
•    Theatrical training through the creation of a Drama School.
•    The promotion of international theatrical exchanges and co-operation, especially in Europe and countries with large Greek populations.
•    Support and encouragement for people working in the theatre in Greece.
Athens Hill Museum
More and more of the hundreds of thousands visitors to the Acropolis Museum are rediscovering the lure of the works of the ancient world and enjoying the grandeur of the sculptures of classical Greece. The Museum’s objective is to transform such enthusiasm into a more substantial relationship between visitors and this ancient cultural heritage which has remained an inspiration for over 25 centuries.
In the past year the Museum once again coordinated all its operations with the visitor as central reference point. Using many different strategies the museum attempts to make visitors real participants in its research program on the interpretation and comprehension of its exhibits.
International recognition of the Acropolis Museum was recently reflected in The Times of London’s research, rating the Museum third amongst the 50 best museums in the world.
Monastiraki
Monastiraki is a flea market neighborhood in the old town of Athens, Greece, and is one of the principal shopping districts in Athens. The area is home to clothing boutiques, souvenir shops, and specialty stores, and is a major tourist attraction in Athens and Attica for bargain shopping. The area is named after Monastiraki Square, which in turn is named for the Pantanassa church monastery that is located within the square. The main streets of this area are Pandrossou Street and Adrianou Street.

The Monastiraki Metro Station, located on the square, serves both Line 1 and Line 3 of the Athens Metro.

Monastiraki is the joy of the collectors. Dozens of small stores, on Hephaestou Street, sell furniture, devices and equipment, clothes and shoes, but also beads, second hand records, decorative items, tools, and whatever else the human mind can think of. On Sunday mornings at the bazaar in Avissinias square, those who are willing to search will discover small treasures among thousands of old objects. Bargaining is a must.

 

Psyrri's Neighborhood
First mentioned in 1678 by the traveller Spohn as one of Athens’ eight original neighbourhoods, Psyrri is one of the city’s oldest and most historic areas. Framed by Athinas, Ermou, Pireos, and Evripidou Streets, it was established under Ottoman occupation, after Athens was selected as the capital of Greece.
Developed by wealthy aristocrats who settled here in neoclassical, two-storey homes, the area later began to attract a new crowd, including members of the koutsavakides, a notorious gang of louts who frequented the taverns of Iroon Square.
But history is never static, and today Psyrri is thriving, its youth clubs, ouzo bars, taverns and cafes attracting multitudes of Greek and foreign visitors. The area is famous for its annual Easter bazaar, which offers everything from agricultural and livestock products to leather goods.
Plaka
Plaka is the old historical neighborhood of Athens, clustered around the northern and eastern slopes of the Acropolis, and incorporating labyrinthine streets and neoclassical architecture. Plaka is built on top of the residential areas of the ancient town of Athens. It is known as the "Neighbourhood of the Gods" due to its proximity to the Acropolis and its many archaeological sites.
Plaka is on the northeast slope of Acropolis, between Syntagma and Monastiraki square. Adrianou Street (running north and south) is the largest and most central street in Plaka and divides it into two areas: the upper level, - Ano Plaka - located right under the Acropolis and the lower level - Kato Plaka - situated between Syntagma and Monastiraki.
Plaka was developed mostly around the ruins of Ancient Agora of Athens in an area that has been continuously inhabited since antiquity. During the years of Ottoman rule, Plaka was the known as the "Turkish quarter of Athens",[7] and the seat of the Turkish Voevode (Governor). During the Greek War of Independence, Plaka like the rest of Athens, was temporarily abandoned by its inhabitants because of the severe battles that took place in 1826. The area was repopulated during the first years of King Otto's rule. Plaka had a sizable Arvanite community till the late 19th century, which led some to refer to it as the Arvanite quarter of Athens[8] .[9][10] At the same period the neighborhood of Anafiotika, featuring traditional Cycladic architecture, was built by settlers from the Aegean island of Anafi.[11]
In 1884 a fire burned down a large part of the neighborhood which gave the opportunity for the archaeologists to conduct excavations in the Roman Market and Hadrian’s library. Excavations have been taking place continuously since 19th century.
Museums in Plaka include the new Jewish Museum of Greece, the Museum of Greek Folk Art, an annex of which is the Old Public Baths building, the Frissiras Museum, the Museum of Popular Music Instruments, the Museum of Pavlos and Alexandra Kanellopoulou and the Athens University Museum. Excavations have proven that Adrianou Street is the oldest street in Athens still in continuous use with exactly the same layout since antiquity.